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Blogging is most certainly not dead

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A few weeks ago, I asked the readers of the Noticing newsletter to send in links to their blogs and newsletters (or to their favorite blogs and newsletters written by others). And boy, did they! I pared the submissions list down to a representative sample and sent it out as last week’s newsletter. Here’s a smaller excerpt of that list…you can find the whole thing here.

Several people wrote in about Swiss Miss, Subtraction, Damn Interesting, Cup of Jo, sites I also read regularly.

Ted pointed me towards Julia Evans’ blog, where she writes mostly (but not exclusively) about programming and technology. One of my favorite things about reading blogs is when their authors go off-topic. (Which might explain why everything on kottke.org is off-topic. Or is everything on-topic?)

Bruce sent in Follow Me Here, which linked to 3 Quarks Daily, a high-quality blog I’d lost track of.

Marcelo Rinesi blogs infrequently about a little bit of everything. “We write to figure out who we are and what we think.”

Futility Closet is “a collection of entertaining curiosities in history, literature, language, art, philosophy, and mathematics, designed to help you waste time as enjoyably as possible”. (Thx, Peter)

Michael Tsai blogs about technology in a very old school way…reading through it felt like a wearing a comfortable old t-shirt.

Sidebar: the five best design links, every day. And Nico Lumma’s Five Things, “five things everyday that I find interesting”.

Pamela wrote in with dozens of links, among them visual blog But Does It Float, neuroscience blog Mind Hacks, the old school Everlasting Blort.

Elsa recommends Accidentally in Code, written by engineer Cate Huston.

Madeleine writes Extraordinary Routines, “sharing interviews, musings and life experiments that explore the intersection between creativity and imperfection”.

Kari has kept her blog for the last 15 years. I love what she wrote about why she writes:

I also keep it out of spite, because I refuse to let social media take everything. Those shapeless, formless platforms haven’t earned it and don’t deserve it. I’ve blogged about this many times, but I still believe it: When I log into Facebook, I see Facebook. When I visit your blog, I see you.

Social media is as compelling as ever, but people are increasingly souring on the surveillance state Skinner boxes like Facebook and Twitter. Decentralized media like blogs and newsletters are looking better and better these days…

Tags: lists   weblogs
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sillygwailo
4 hours ago
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Toronto, ON
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DMack
3 days ago
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Now that all the celebrities have abandoned tumblr, there's a secret golden age of Content going on
Victoria, BC

Stunt pilot restarts his single engine in the nick of time

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I always feel a little silly when I click through to watch videos with titles like “Plane Miraculously Flies To Safety After Sudden Engine Failure”, like I’m indulging in clickbait, a sugary online snack when I’m supposed to be consuming healthier fare. But my dad was a pilot when I was a kid, so I will watch any flying video that comes along (along with 35 minutes of “related videos” on YouTube…send help!)

But this one in particular is worth a look because all the drama lasts for less than a minute and the first person view from the camera (which is mounted on the pilot’s head) puts you right into the cockpit.1 One of the coolest things about wearable cameras like the GoPro is that ability to put the viewer into the action, to create a visceral sense of empathy with that person doing that thing. That pilot’s eyes are our eyes for those 60 seconds. You see the engine fail. Your arm reaches out to the controls and attempts to address the problem. You pull the plane up into a glide. You look around for somewhere to ditch. Ah, there. You turn the plane. You keep trying to restart the engine… I don’t know about you, but my palms were pretty sweaty by the time that video was over.

I’ve been paying way more attention to the different ways in which filmmakers use the camera to create this sort of empathy since watching Evan Puschak’s video on how David Fincher’s camera hijacks your eyes. The first-person camera view, where the camera moves as if it were swiveling around on a real person’s neck, is a particularly effective technique. Even if the scene in this video weren’t real, it would be difficult to convince your brain otherwise given your vantage point. (via digg)

  1. And don’t skimp on the sound either, put those headphones on. The sound of the suddenly rushing wind after the engine quits, of gravity asserting itself, is quite alarming.

Tags: David Fincher   flying   movies   video
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sillygwailo
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Los Angeles in Buildings: Scientology Pacific Area Command Base

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Known casually as "Big Blue," this Scientology building on Fountain Avenue looks every inch like the grand, private fortresses of old Los Angeles.
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sillygwailo
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Toronto, ON
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Shawn Micallef: Heritage should not be an excuse for NIMBYism

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Is it possible, Shawn Micallef asks, that because the idea of heritage has been so watered down that when something important and worthy of saving is at risk we can no longer muster the conviction to mount a proper Toronto fight to save it?
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sillygwailo
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Toronto, ON
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ROM’s newly reopened Indigenous galleries ‘a great beginning’

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With the renewed Daphne Cockwell Gallery of Canada, now free of charge, the museum takes a step toward closing the rift between Indigenous communities and mainstream society, writes Murray Whyte.
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sillygwailo
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Mending The Gap

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We are super excited to announce that AKASHA is now accessible also from Mist and classic web browsers running the MetaMask and IPFS Companion extensions!!! \o/ This release also marks an important milestone because we are starting to close the gap between the (usually slow) user experience on decentralized services vs (usually faster) centralized ones. It’s quite magical, especially when considering how antithetical the two approaches are.
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sillygwailo
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